What’s New At WLRI NEWSRADIO

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We’re working to match the pace of information we report with the content we post here at MyWLRI.  At the moment WLRI is in the process of testing several different website options, as you may have noticed. We’re testing everything, all script, settings and security. For now, we’re running our current version of MyWLRI.com. In the next few days (+/-) you will experience a new MyWLRI.com that matches your listening experience. Brining you to the report you just heard, with the facts to back it up. All at your convenience.  Our volunteers have been working around some unexpected internet service disruptions and flawed concepts. We’ve embraced the best attributes while providing a safe, secure and responsible place for our community to engage new ideas, information and conversation with each other. We want to make sure we’re give our full attention to the various interests of our community, and present a website that reflects quick, reliable and current information.

 

We thank you for your extended patience while we interrupt services to improve upon our overall services. We are working quickly.

PA Agriculture Secretary Issues Statement on 2018 Federal Farm Bill’s Introduction in U.S. House

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Harrisburg, PA – Secretary of Agriculture Russell Redding today commended the U.S. House of Representatives for the initial release of a draft federal Farm Bill, legislation that provides funding and guidelines for farm and food programs in the United States. While noting the challenges of crafting such a wide-ranging piece of legislation, Redding said the bill contains a number of positive aspects for Pennsylvania agriculture, but also areas that are in need of improvement and that require further evaluation.

“The importance of the federal Farm Bill to Pennsylvania’s agriculture industry cannot be overstated,” said Redding. “Farm Bill programs are investments in production agriculture, our environment, our economy and our people. I appreciate the work of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture to get us to this point, including the members of our own delegation who serve on the committee, Congressmen Glenn Thompson and Dwight Evans.

“Passing a final bill is never an easy task, but we look forward to working with our U.S. representatives and stakeholders to ensure the best interests of our food and agriculture industries, as well as rural Pennsylvania, are considered throughout the process.”

At the direction of Governor Tom Wolf, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has been actively engaging in conversations around the Farm Bill. Secretary Redding has written to Pennsylvania’s congressional delegation to convey the commonwealth’s priorities, such as ensuring that resources, support, and tools are available to dairy farmers; that industrial hemp be classified as an agricultural commodity; that more funding more funding is made available to combat invasive species like the Spotted Lanternfly; and that the federal government continue to support vital farmland preservation and conservation programs that benefit water quality. In addition, the department is eager to see that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which provides food assistance to nearly 2,000,000 Pennsylvania residents, while also supporting Pennsylvania growers, processors, and distributors, is fully funded.

For more information about the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s programs and services, or to read the state’s Agriculture Economic Impact Study, visit the department’s website at agriculture.pa.gov.

206 Million Eggs Recalled; PA Among States Impacted; Rose Acre Farms Recalls Shell Eggs Due to Possible Health Risk

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Through an abundance of caution Rose Acre Farms of Seymour, Indiana is voluntarily recalling 206,749,248 eggs because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Braenderup, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy individuals infected with SalmonellaBraenderup can experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella Braenderup can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The eggs were distributed from the farm in Hyde County, North Carolina and reached consumers in the following states: Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia through retail stores and restaurants via direct delivery.

22 illnesses have been reported to date.

The affected eggs, from plant number P-1065 with the Julian date range of 011 through date of 102 printed on either the side portion or the principal side of the carton or package, as follows:

Lot Codes 011 – 102

Item Description Carton UPC
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A LARGE X 30 DOZEN 077236000302
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A LARGE X15 DOZEN 077236000302
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A JUMBO X24 DOZEN 077236000500
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A MEDIUM X30 DOZEN 077236000203
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A XLARGE X30 DOZEN 077236000401
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A JUMBO X12 DOZEN 077236000500
FOOD LION A JUMBO X 12 DOZEN 035826089618
FOOD LION A MEDIUM X15 DOZEN 035826089649
FOOD LION A XLARGE X 15 DOZEN 035826089625
FOOD LION A 18PK LARGE X15 DOZEN 035826089601
FOOD LION A LARGE X15 DOZEN 035826089588
FOOD LION A 6PK LARGE X 15 DOZEN 035826089632
LOOSE A USDA SMALL X 30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A USDA MEDIUM X 30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A XLARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A MEDIUM X 15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A MEDIUM X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA XLARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA MEDIUM X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE AA XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE PFG X 30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE PFG X 15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA A XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
NELMS A JUMBO X24 634181000018
WAFFLE HOUSE LOOSE USDA A LARGE X 30 DOZEN N/A
CRYSTAL FARMS A MEDIUM X30 077236000203
CRYSTAL FARMS A 18PK MEDIUM X 30 077236000258
CRYSTAL FARMS A 2.5 DOZ MEDIUM X 25 077236000124
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A XLARGE X15 DOZEN 077236000401
COUNTRY DAYBREAK USDA GRADE A XLARGE X 240 DOZEN PULP 077236700400
COUNTRY DAYBREAK USDA GRADE A LARGE RACK X 240 DOZEN PULP 077236700301
COBURN FARMS A MEDIUM MP X 30 DOZEN 051933182608
COBURN FARMS A LARGE X 30 DOZEN 051933190801
COBURN FARMS A 18PK LARGE X 30 DOZEN 051933182509
SUNSHINE FARMS A JUMBO X 12 DOZEN 804879457336
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE LARGE (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE LARGE (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE MEDIUM (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE XLARGE (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE MEDIUM (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE XLARGE (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 18PK XLARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127132
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK XLARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127128
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA TWIN 18PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127101
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 6PK LARGE X 15 DOZEN 078742127095
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK MEDIUM X 15 DOZEN 078742127224
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127071
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 18PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127088
GREAT VALUE GRADE A 12PK JUMBO X 22 DOZEN RPC 078742127149
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 5DZ LARGE X 5 DOZEN 078742127118

The voluntary recall was a result of some illnesses reported on the U.S. East Coast, which led to extensive interviews and eventually a thorough FDA inspection of the Hyde County farm, which produces 2.3 million eggs a day. The facility includes 3 million laying hens with a USDA inspector on-site daily.

Consumers who have purchased shells eggs are urged to immediately discontinue use of the recalled eggs and to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at (855) 215-5730 between the hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Standard time.

 

Department of State Tells Counties to Have New Voting Systems in Place by End of 2019

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Harrisburg, PA –  Acting Secretary of State Robert Torres today informed Pennsylvania’s counties to have voter-verifiable paper record voting systems selected no later than December 31, 2019, and preferably in place by the November 2019 general election. He also announced the commonwealth will receive nearly $14 million in federal funding to assist counties with replacement.

“We have been planning for some time to bring Pennsylvania’s voting machines up to 21st-century standards of security, auditability and resiliency,” Torres said. “The federal assistance could not come at a more opportune moment.”
Pennsylvania’s allocation of $13.5 million comes from Congress’ recent appropriation of $380 million for election security under the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2018. The funding is being distributed under provisions of the Help America Vote Act of 2002. Each state’s allocation requires a 5-percent state match, bringing Pennsylvania’s total funding package to $14.15 million.
The administration is committed to working with the legislature to help fund these voting system upgrades, including but not limited to the consideration of future year cost-sharing arrangements which could use local, state, and federal dollars.
Last week the department released an Invitation For Bid (IFB) for new voting systems, directing that new systems meet enhanced security and auditability standards. The IFB updated an existing state-negotiated agreement with vendors and can be used by counties to purchase voting systems that meet the department’s certification requirements.
 “We want to bring about the system upgrades so Pennsylvania voters are voting on the most secure and auditable equipment as promptly and feasibly as possible, while also being supportive of the counties’ need to plan and budget for the new systems,” Torres said.
The department is also exploring every option to help fund or finance the upgrades, including lease agreements, grant opportunities, state, local, and additional federal appropriations, partnerships, bonds, and more.
To kick off public education about new voting systems on the market, the department plans to hold a vendor demonstration April 26 at the Farm Show complex. The event will provide an opportunity for county and state officials, legislators, the media, and the public to explore the features and options offered by the new machines. Details on the event will be forthcoming.
Counties will be able to choose from among any of the voting systems examined and certified after January 1, 2018, by both the federal Election Assistance Commission and the Secretary of the Commonwealth. To date, one system has been certified, and several others will follow in the summer and fall of 2018.  Information regarding the examination and certification process (PDF) can be found on the department’s website. The department will provide extensive support and guidance to the county Boards of Election and voters to ensure a smooth transition to the new systems.
In the meantime, Pennsylvania is employing extensive measures and partnering with federal and state law enforcement agencies to stay one step ahead of any threats to our security and infrastructure, including comprehensive monitoring and assessment of risk, fortification of physical and cyber security, training and resources to counties and partners, and increasing communications at all levels.

Education Advocates Call for Boost in Special-Ed Funding

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By:Andrea Sears

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Two dozen disability-rights groups, child- and education-advocacy organizations have signed on to a letter asking lawmakers to increase funding for special education.

The more than 270,000 students in special education in Pennsylvania are legally entitled to additional supports and services. They may need access to certified school psychologists, therapists, nurses and specially trained teachers.

But from 2008 to 2014, state aid for special ed was frozen while costs continued to climb. According to Reynelle Staley, policy attorney with the Education Law Center, state funding has increased in recent budgets, but there’s still a long way to go.

“The state has an obligation to catch up and to meet the expenses of students across the state,” says Staley, “and to reduce the burden that local districts are carrying as a result of the state’s failure to adequately fund special education.”

The groups want the Legislature to approve Governor Tom Wolf’s proposal for $20 million in additional special-education funding.

Staley adds that special education also is tied to overall funding through the state’s need-based funding formula. The advocates are urging legislators to approve both the increase in special-ed funds, and the proposed $100 million of additional basic education funds.

“Neither is nearly close to enough to meet the adequacy gap that exists in our state,” says Staley, “but we think they’re an important first step to addressing students’ needs.”

She says ten years ago there was an estimated $380 million funding gap for special education, and the cost of delivering services has been rising faster than state funding.

Electric-Vehicle Bill a Potential Win for PA

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By: Andrea Sears

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Pennsylvania is lagging behind some other states in creating the infrastructure to support electric vehicles, but a bill making its way through the Legislature could change that.

Transportation is one of the main sources of carbon pollution. But without a reliable network of charging stations, consumers are reluctant to switch to clean electric vehicles.

Noah Garcia, transportation policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council, says passage of House Bill 1446 would be a major win for clean energy in the Commonwealth. It would establish a statewide goal for transportation electrification.

“That goal would be to achieve levels of transportation electrification at least 50 percent above what would be expected to be business as usual by 2030,” says Garcia.

HB 1446 passed the House Transportation Committee with strong support and is expected to reach the floor of the House for a vote in the coming weeks.

Garcia notes that the bill also would require the state’s electric utilities and electric-vehicle charging service providers to create and implement a plan to meet the electrification goals.

“Those plans will include the deployment of charging infrastructure necessary to support a greater number of electric vehicles in the state,” says Garcia.

There are currently fewer than 300 charging stations and about 12,000 electric vehicles in Pennsylvania. In contrast, New York now has 600 charging stations and 30,000 electric vehicles.

Garcia notes that H-B 1446 has broad support not only from environmentalists but from vehicle manufacturers and business.

“We’re really seeing electric utilities playing a key and complimentary role in breaking down barriers to EV adoption,” says Garcia, “that we think is necessary not only to fight climate change but to modernize our transportation systems, clean up our air and boost economic growth.”

He adds that as electric vehicles get more efficient and extend their range, expanding the charging infrastructure will become critical to support growing demand.

New Feature: Now You Can Post Directly To MyWLRI.com

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We’re excited to announce that our registered website users may now post content to our community’s website. Unlike traditional social media websites, we have given you full control of your posts. So, when you see news happen- or when you want to get the word out about a local event or happening, just head to MyWLRI.com. Then click the “Members” tab. Log in (as needed), enter your post information, insert pictures, video, html code or whatever you feel is necessitous and compelling enough to share with everyone in our community, and the world. You can also browse posts by other neighborhood members and touch base with family. Share important life events of which you want the public to be aware of. Celebrate your birthday, graduation or special event with your community, and make it easier for friends, family and loved ones to safely and securely keep in touch with you and your contribution to our community.

 

Another way you may now post directly to our community’s website is in our brand spanking new #Community Room chat center. In the CRCC you can easily engage in safe communication with other users, talk with friends, family, co-workers, non-profit group members, stream live video and audio, send files, pictures and emojis. Take your community room conversation private, and talk with MyWLRI Messenger, directly with any of the other registered members that accept your request. Combine all of these features with the wealth of education and entertainment you will find here and you will have no need to pay for any of these services again. Don’t see something? Have a cool idea of what we should add? Send us a direct message. We’re always listening to what you have to say and putting it to practice. Thank you for being the biggest part of what we do, and why we’re doing it.

Welcome to the neighborhood

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Welcome to your new social media alternative. We’re local. Right here in Lancaster County and Chester County, PA. We’re supported directly by you, and we don’t sell your data. We hope to have created a place that can be what social media could be without the profit motive.  Please use this resource to help us improve, enhance and protect the quality of life for all. This will be whatever we can make it. So far, our community has volunteered their time, knowledge and hard word to craft this very website. Everything you see and interact with was created or put together, tested and monitored by local, trained volunteers. Most of our help comes from kids, adults and everyone in between. We truly encourage everyone to participate and register for their own account. Doing so enables you with the tools needed to communicate directly with our community, from anywhere- in addition to alerting WLRI to late breaking information that may be of public interest. With this resource we can provide more local content without the sales pitch that you’ll find elsewhere. Keep coming back to see what’s going on around our area and to also find out what new features, tools or free resources we’re offering. From all of us at WLRI 93FM and MyWLRI.com, thank you for stopping by today and welcome to the all new MyWLRI.com

 

Sincerely,

Christian McLaughlin

General Manager

WLRI 93FM NEWSRADIO / MyWLRI.com

PA House Abortion Ban Bill Called Unconstitutional

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By: Andrea Sears

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Civil-liberties advocates call a bill passed Monday by Pennsylvania’s House Health Committee “unconstitutional and unenforceable.”

House Bill 2050 would make it a crime to perform an abortion based on a fetal diagnosis of Down syndrome. Elizabeth Randol, legislative director for the ACLU of Pennsylvania, noted that other states have passed similar laws, but none has gone into effect.

“It attempts to ban abortion prior to viability,” she said, “and, beginning in Roe vs. Wade all the way through subsequent Supreme Court decisions, that has been repeatedly affirmed flatly unconstitutional.”

Supporters of the bill have said people with Down syndrome can lead happy lives and contribute to their communities. HB 2050 could come up for a final vote in the House next week. There is no similar bill in the Senate.

Randol said medical test results are not shared with law enforcement and establishing a diagnosis as the sole motivation for an abortion would be difficult at best. She contended that the legislation is strictly political.

“It utilizes a very difficult decision for some people and a very complex one to exploit the people that it affects as a wedge to try to legislate abortion control,” she said.

She added that the bill was put on the committee’s agenda late last Friday afternoon, after it was too late for members of the House to file amendments.

Randol said there already is a very long waiting list of people with intellectual disabilities such as Down syndrome in Pennsylvania who are desperate for services. There is inadequate state funding for support professionals, she said, but this bill doesn’t address those issues.

“They have done nothing to provide any help or assistance for both children and adults with Down syndrome,” she said, “and no assistance or education for women or parents who would want to bring a pregnancy to term.”

A federal court stopped implementation of a similar law in Indiana in 2016, and last month an Ohio ban was blocked while a lawsuit challenging it is litigated.

The text of House Bill 2050 is online at legis.state.pa.us.